Three ways to hatch guinea eggs...



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

IN A FIELD
IN THE COOP
IN AN INCUBATOR

 
 

Graphic Intense, but worth the wait...
 
 

This white Guinea Hen beat the odds against predators and successfully hatched her own eggs in a field.  It took the owner 2 weeks to find her missing hen.  When she spotted the guinea hen walking her keets across the yard, she gathered the keets in a bucket and brought them home to safety. 
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If you watch closely, the mate or other hens will "let you know" where a nest is, but you will still need to look closely. Can you see the guinea hen on her nest in this picture?

take a closer look

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These guinea hens enclosed in a fenced yard hatched a total of only 9 eggs between them. A good broody chicken hen can successfully hatch keets in a nesting box or the henhouse too! 

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inside an enclosed yard

 

dubmitted by Brian S.       Submitted by Brian S.


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.photo donated by Carolee
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To encourage a guinea hen to lay indoors, lean a board against the wall or stack a few bales of straw for her to hide behind.
Emmy Jean's broody hens
 
 

 Sometimes a chicken and guinea hen will decide to share the job.
Donated by Don and Edie.
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Thanks to the Digman's !
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A Silkie hen is great for hatching guinea eggs and raising keets.
Sudy's Silkie hen raising keets she hatched.
 

The safest and most reliable way to count on an excellent hatch rate with the least worry is to use an incubator.  This photo is only a few hours into the hatch.  With proper care of the eggs before and during incubation, you can expect a 90% or better hatch rate. These precious little babes are PIED KEETS. 

There are several incubators on the market, available mail order or at farm supply stores, ranging from under $50 to several thousand dollars.  For home use, click here to read about the incubator I use:  Incubator

 

and submitted byBrian SC...

 

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